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Pradiptaa Chakraborty

sirsa, India 5 Followers

About Artist

Chronicle of Humanism Upanisad says… “Every Human form represents a chariot, and consciousness is the charioteer, intuition its harness, five senses are five horses. The one, who could conquer...

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Chronicle of Humanism

Upanisad says… “Every Human form represents a chariot, and consciousness is the charioteer, intuition its harness, five senses are five horses. The one, who could conquer this wandering consciousness, becomes the recipient of pleasures and pains.”………





What kind of an artist is Pradipta Chakrabarty, with his unusual imagery of the human form, one that penetrates into the very nature of human beings?

Is he an artist of the absurd? Many a time has serious reality couched itself in the theatre of the absurd. So could it be in the works of Pradipta.



Intricate, exceedingly elaborate, ornamental and laborious, reality and imagination juxtapose themselves one upon the other in a relentless manner that can be mind-boggling at a glance. But closer scrutiny has many a tale to tell. A dreamer and a wonderer, from childhood to youth and adult life, the artist has been fraught with questions—about life, love and society at large.



When do norms end and emotion hold sway? Or contrarily how far can emotion soar before norms surface to clip its wings? Age-old hierarchies continue to bewilder our artist, who eventually takes recourse in expressing through art, relaying thoughts and observations of a very personal kind, spreading over a very wide and varied canvas of ideas and ideologies, allusions and references, and a recollection of narratives as part of his ethos and culture. Reverted and reinvented, most of these allegories have harsh stories to tell, steeped as they are in a kind of black humour that hovers in the corridors pending subversion.



With the artist’s concerns stretching over multiple subjects, ranging from lurking human desire and uncertainty, wavering self worth, and trans gender issues, laden with multiple influences, references and tributes, the works though visually engaging and artistically admirable, are not the easiest to comprehend. They settle on the senses like a jigsaw puzzle waiting to be de-coded; and while the viewer gets douched in the intricacies of the compositions, curiosity holds sway, compelling an exercise in comprehension.



The symbology employed is of a personal nature, clearest unto himself. Designed with people and backdrops, the ambience is completed by the sundry bird and animal, decidedly allusive in keeping with his style, playing the role of little wise mascots within the frame. They watch at close quarters the manic human race play out its drama, even as their inclusion comes in as a gentle reminder of their smallness and indifferent existence.



The rich compositions are treated to intricate backdrops and closely printed attire, perfected to the last detail. The works run like a fine tapestry of high drama, where man, woman and accepted realities catapult into physical and behavioral anomalies at times drastically subverting the usual and the expected. Dwelling largely on trans gender relationship and love, the artist believes “when love is real and all consuming it becomes universal, transcending social, communal and religious boundaries; under the circumstances manacles of gender cease to exist, and it is all a seamless flow of unconditional love.” The power of love should be allowed to flow-across people, gender and region without embargo. That would be the ideal situation he envisions.



Past his medley of opulent human figures and their equally baroque surroundings one notices the eyes of the protagonists: more than one in each frame— more lustful than amorous, more knowing than suspicious, grim and thirsty by turns, yearning even, as they await their turn. The cat at the foot of Olympia/Chameli’s bed seems to epitomize this opportunism. The general atmosphere running through the series seems to be one of devious anticipation, baiting and waiting. Is it that in spite of all the freedom acquired no one yet actually dares to be genuine?



Sensing uncertainty, a dilemma of what and how to be, of when or not to attain satisfaction, in the eyes of almost everyone around, his surmises, “Life is a juggler’s game, played to veil hidden instincts. As the conjurer on the road juggles his paraphernalia to entertain, so has showmanship become the grain of human existence.”



A few observations may well serve to substantiate his view. Hypocrisy appears to have destroyed our social layers from within and brought us to our lowest level of all time. We no longer value others for who they are, we materialize everything and everyone. From trade to relationships, friendship to morality and love, even in artificial hugs and kisses, hypocrisy reigns supreme. Which brings us to the crux of Pradipto’s contention in these works of art.



In “Gustav Believed….La Fiesta in Oscula” the couple embraced in a kiss are vastly removed from Klimt’s world renowned work, The Kiss. Made evident in the glances cast by the characters is the contrast between love then and now. In conveying the present scenario Pradipto replaces the fluidity, innocence and surrender portrayed in Klimt’s painting by imlying a restless, distracted mind, probably calculating thoughts of another partner while still in the arms of the present one.

Again, Binodini In Red, refers to Notee Binodini, a prostitute who rose to become a pioneering Bengali stage actress, who wrote an autobiography. It recalls the exceptional journey of a 19th century 'outcast' woman, while trying to establish a dialogue with our own present times. Seen are four performers from contemporary Bengali stage as they perform as Binodini, supported by a group of traditional 'jatra' musicians. Characteristic of Pradipto, the work, instead of trying to create a coherent historical narrative complete in its experienced details, is rather a deliberately fragmented exploration of a highly 'coded text' – ruptured, silent and secretive. This in conjunction with Mahabharats’s Draupadi are both protagonists in the artist’s narrative of unjustly treated women.

Living in a world fraught with constant judgements, assessments, criticisma, ever struggling to fit in- be it at work, home or a social gathering, depression, low self-esteem, sadness and insecurity have come to characterise our society. Hollow and shallow, our only tie with our fellow human beings is the DNA. Isn’t it about time that we woke up from this nightmare?



Aruna Bhowmick

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Testimonials

  • BIODATA

  • About Artist

    Chronicle of Humanism

    Upanisad says… “Every Human form represents a chariot, and consciousness is the charioteer, intuition its harness, five senses are five horses. The one, who could conquer this wandering consciousness, becomes the recipient of pleasures and pains.”………





    What kind of an artist is Pradipta Chakrabarty, with his unusual imagery of the human form, one that penetrates into the very nature of human beings?

    Is he an artist of the absurd? Many a time has serious reality couched itself in the theatre of the absurd. So could it be in the works of Pradipta.



    Intricate, exceedingly elaborate, ornamental and laborious, reality and imagination juxtapose themselves one upon the other in a relentless manner that can be mind-boggling at a glance. But closer scrutiny has many a tale to tell. A dreamer and a wonderer, from childhood to youth and adult life, the artist has been fraught with questions—about life, love and society at large.



    When do norms end and emotion hold sway? Or contrarily how far can emotion soar before norms surface to clip its wings? Age-old hierarchies continue to bewilder our artist, who eventually takes recourse in expressing through art, relaying thoughts and observations of a very personal kind, spreading over a very wide and varied canvas of ideas and ideologies, allusions and references, and a recollection of narratives as part of his ethos and culture. Reverted and reinvented, most of these allegories have harsh stories to tell, steeped as they are in a kind of black humour that hovers in the corridors pending subversion.



    With the artist’s concerns stretching over multiple subjects, ranging from lurking human desire and uncertainty, wavering self worth, and trans gender issues, laden with multiple influences, references and tributes, the works though visually engaging and artistically admirable, are not the easiest to comprehend. They settle on the senses like a jigsaw puzzle waiting to be de-coded; and while the viewer gets douched in the intricacies of the compositions, curiosity holds sway, compelling an exercise in comprehension.



    The symbology employed is of a personal nature, clearest unto himself. Designed with people and backdrops, the ambience is completed by the sundry bird and animal, decidedly allusive in keeping with his style, playing the role of little wise mascots within the frame. They watch at close quarters the manic human race play out its drama, even as their inclusion comes in as a gentle reminder of their smallness and indifferent existence.



    The rich compositions are treated to intricate backdrops and closely printed attire, perfected to the last detail. The works run like a fine tapestry of high drama, where man, woman and accepted realities catapult into physical and behavioral anomalies at times drastically subverting the usual and the expected. Dwelling largely on trans gender relationship and love, the artist believes “when love is real and all consuming it becomes universal, transcending social, communal and religious boundaries; under the circumstances manacles of gender cease to exist, and it is all a seamless flow of unconditional love.” The power of love should be allowed to flow-across people, gender and region without embargo. That would be the ideal situation he envisions.



    Past his medley of opulent human figures and their equally baroque surroundings one notices the eyes of the protagonists: more than one in each frame— more lustful than amorous, more knowing than suspicious, grim and thirsty by turns, yearning even, as they await their turn. The cat at the foot of Olympia/Chameli’s bed seems to epitomize this opportunism. The general atmosphere running through the series seems to be one of devious anticipation, baiting and waiting. Is it that in spite of all the freedom acquired no one yet actually dares to be genuine?



    Sensing uncertainty, a dilemma of what and how to be, of when or not to attain satisfaction, in the eyes of almost everyone around, his surmises, “Life is a juggler’s game, played to veil hidden instincts. As the conjurer on the road juggles his paraphernalia to entertain, so has showmanship become the grain of human existence.”



    A few observations may well serve to substantiate his view. Hypocrisy appears to have destroyed our social layers from within and brought us to our lowest level of all time. We no longer value others for who they are, we materialize everything and everyone. From trade to relationships, friendship to morality and love, even in artificial hugs and kisses, hypocrisy reigns supreme. Which brings us to the crux of Pradipto’s contention in these works of art.



    In “Gustav Believed….La Fiesta in Oscula” the couple embraced in a kiss are vastly removed from Klimt’s world renowned work, The Kiss. Made evident in the glances cast by the characters is the contrast between love then and now. In conveying the present scenario Pradipto replaces the fluidity, innocence and surrender portrayed in Klimt’s painting by imlying a restless, distracted mind, probably calculating thoughts of another partner while still in the arms of the present one.

    Again, Binodini In Red, refers to Notee Binodini, a prostitute who rose to become a pioneering Bengali stage actress, who wrote an autobiography. It recalls the exceptional journey of a 19th century 'outcast' woman, while trying to establish a dialogue with our own present times. Seen are four performers from contemporary Bengali stage as they perform as Binodini, supported by a group of traditional 'jatra' musicians. Characteristic of Pradipto, the work, instead of trying to create a coherent historical narrative complete in its experienced details, is rather a deliberately fragmented exploration of a highly 'coded text' – ruptured, silent and secretive. This in conjunction with Mahabharats’s Draupadi are both protagonists in the artist’s narrative of unjustly treated women.

    Living in a world fraught with constant judgements, assessments, criticisma, ever struggling to fit in- be it at work, home or a social gathering, depression, low self-esteem, sadness and insecurity have come to characterise our society. Hollow and shallow, our only tie with our fellow human beings is the DNA. Isn’t it about time that we woke up from this nightmare?



    Aruna Bhowmick

  • Academics

    • BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS (B.F.A) in Graphics from Kala Bhavana, Vishva Bharati University, Shantiniketan, West Bengal (from 1998 to 2003).

    • FIVE YEARS DEPLOMA in Painting From Rabindra Bharati University,Kolkata
    West Bengal.

  • Exhibitions

    SHOWS


    Forthcoming Master show in Alturaash gallery

    Solo Shows:

    Solo show in New Delhi with Mr. Mohit Jain Dhoomimal Art Centre in 2019.

    Solo show in New Delhi with Payel Kapoor Arushi Art Gallery in 2016.

    Solo show in kolkata with sounak chakraborty… SENSORIUM in august 2016.

    “PASSION PLAY” Solo show in Sarjan art gallery, Boroda, India in 2008.

    Selected Group Shows:

    A big master show in Indian art fair New Delhi 2018.

    HARVEST A GROUP SHOW IN ARUSHI ART GALLERY, 2018.

    PALETTE’ 18. ART WALK. A MASTER GROUP SHOW, 2018.

    WORLD ART DUBAI 2018. SHOW WITH ART ZEST.

    Indian art fair New Delhi 2017

    BUSHAN ART FAIR 2017. WITH GALLERY 1000A

    HARVEST A GROUP SHOW IN ARUSHI ART GALLERY,2017

    Dubai art fair 2017.

    Shingapoor art fair 2017.

    ART FOR CONSERN 2017, A MASTER GROUP SHOW.

    “SENSORIUM” Present Suladharini - The Spear Wielder and Huntress of Evil" Master group show in Kolkata, 2015.

    Permanent Marker…. Group show in KOlkata, 2015.

    CPAA Present “colours of life” Art viewing Room, Mumbai. 2015.

    “Art in the air”, group show in Dubai, 2015.

    “What I can do, I must do.” Group shop – Rippan Kapur, Founder, CRY (1954-1994) 2014

    “Watch Out” group show in ArtAlive Gallery, Gurgaon. 2014.

    “SENSORIUM” present Suladharini - The Spear Wielder and Huntress of Evil" Master group show in Kolkata, 2014.

    “Behind the canvas”, group show in Dubai, 2013.

    “SENSORIUM” Master group show in Kolkata, 2013.

    “Fantasy” Group show in Chandigarh Art Museum 2013.

    “An Art Store” Group show in Gallery Kolkata 2013

    “Carpe Diem” Group show of contemporary art, in Nvya Gallerie New Delhi, 2011.

    “July Screening” in Shakshi Gallery in Mumbai, 2010.

    “Fresh Departures” A Group Show in Gallery Kolkata, in kolkata 2010

    “Within Reach II” A Group Show in Gallerie Nvya in NewDelhi, 2010.

    Three way exchange exhibition with Comferwell College of Arts, LONDON. 2002.

    National Art School, Sydney, AUSTRALIA 2002.

    An Exchange Exhibition with SAGA ART COLLEGE, JAPAN 2002.

    A Group Show in Institute of Music & Fine Arts, JAMMU 2002.

    Annual Group Exhibition, NANDAN ART GALLERY SHANTINIKETAN 2002, 2003.

    COLLECTIONS
    • CEDAR SENAI CENTRE IN LOS ANGELES PERSONAL COLLECTION.
    • TWINKIL KHANNAS’S PERSONAL COLLECTION.
    • ILLA AURUN JI’S PERSONAL COLLECTION.
    • GALLERY RAGINI PERSONAL COLLECTION.
    • GALLERY SARJAN ART PERSONAL COLLECTION.

    • GALLERY KOLKATA PERSONAL COLLECTION.
    • GALLERY ARUSHI ART PERSONAL COLLECTION.
    • GROVER INFOTECH, GROUP OF COMPANIS, DELHI PERSONAL COLLECTION.






  • Award & Recognition

    • National Scholarship to Young Artists in Different Fields for the year 2003-2004.
    • Merit Scholarship from Kala Bhavana Shantiniketan Vishva Bharati University, Shantiniketan, West Bengal 1999-2000, 2000-2001, 2001-2002, 2002-2003.

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