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Nabanita Guha

Kolkata, India 4 Followers

About Artist

Nabanita Guha’s Bengali heritage is a direct link to the conception of the figures. In a surreal landscape human beings wander with animals and mythological creatures. She weaves them into her canvas with paint and a ...

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Nabanita Guha’s Bengali heritage is a direct link to the conception of the figures. In a surreal landscape human beings wander with animals and mythological creatures. She weaves them into her canvas with paint and a fine thread running through. With this intimacy the process of creation manipulates the materials in a way that pays tribute to both the real and the imagined aspects of her life. Embedded in them are animal, god and goddess meticulously reproduced from the commercial stickers that flash by on a local bus or decorate the fridge in the living room.

Like the narrative scrolls of her native place her painting is entangled with human life. Above all, female sexuality is the wellspring from which flow the dreams. At its centre is the mysterious hidden cave from where the life giving blood comes. Veins engorged with blood make network of pattern. When it breaks, this monthly discomfort is a badge of female identity – it fills the mind, like the billowing russet cloud at sunset. As a female artist Nabanita’s use of line, texture, and colour is extracted from nature. Unexpectedly water breaks out of its sac. Babies float in the womb. It proclaims: Woman is an embodiment of fertility – the proud bearer of life.

The images relates to Nabanita’s cultural experiences. The sight of idyllic countryside – women unceremoniously dip into ponds fringed with trees – fish frolic, children play, men fish, smoke beedi. But seductive, sensual beauty is fragile, a blessing and a curse. In the Asian countries, objectified woman is at the centre of fertility tourism, straddling along with the age old sex tourism. The booming exploitation of woman, the very idea of treating her as pleasurable sex object or worse, mars the beauty and purity that once inspired poets and artists alike. The artist is keenly aware of the revolting shift. The fragments of nature, culture, and the joy of family hold the hope. At the same time conflict, sadness and fear are intertwined into her work.

Her language of art is allegoric treatment of painful reality and contemporary social issues. Metaphors for male female encounter in real space make it relevant for all times. Her use of mythology, miniature painting tradition and popular culture includes visuals from the Indian comic books. It brings to light feminist and queer narratives. Ideas are interwoven with socio-economic-political reality in contemporary urban life. For her keen observation of life around her Nabanita received recognition for her sensitive portrayal of the woman’s inner self.

Her journey to Korea and China enriched her experience. Her art thrives on her interaction with people. Her search is however to identify how identity is formed in the in-between spaces of cross cultural encounter. She naturally gravitates towards women’s issues, which are underrepresented and who often do not have a place in mainstream media. Her art raise questions about what and where woman is at the moment, while evoking issues such as identity, tradition and modernity, motherhood, and the role of art in social change.

What is distinctly Nabanita is her commentary on Metamorphosis – the ease with which she communicates the idea of transformation by means of hybridity and distortion of form is engrossing. The stitchery as surface pattern is the vein filled with human blood and sweat. It is expressive of the strength and structure she values in life. It is also the empathy she shares with those downtrodden and those who those who struggle for survival against overwhelming odds. Thus, the marginalized and the brave female central to the narrative gains ultimate victory through the blessings of the bloodthirsty warrior goddess

The silence within the landscape is the abstract space, in which texture of minimal shapes and colourful human and animal forms are vital elements. It holds a mirror to classical Indian miniature she admires and strives to make it a major role player. Stitch by stitch the built up texture is derived from indigenous kantha. It is a patterned quilt lovingly made by a matriarch to swaddle a newborn. Nabanita’s paintings are borne of love for the woman, the mother and the caregiver. Her paintings come from unrestrained passion for life and justice.

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4 Artworks for sale

1 Sold Artworks

Testimonials

  • BIODATA

  • About Artist

    Nabanita Guha’s Bengali heritage is a direct link to the conception of the figures. In a surreal landscape human beings wander with animals and mythological creatures. She weaves them into her canvas with paint and a fine thread running through. With this intimacy the process of creation manipulates the materials in a way that pays tribute to both the real and the imagined aspects of her life. Embedded in them are animal, god and goddess meticulously reproduced from the commercial stickers that flash by on a local bus or decorate the fridge in the living room.

    Like the narrative scrolls of her native place her painting is entangled with human life. Above all, female sexuality is the wellspring from which flow the dreams. At its centre is the mysterious hidden cave from where the life giving blood comes. Veins engorged with blood make network of pattern. When it breaks, this monthly discomfort is a badge of female identity – it fills the mind, like the billowing russet cloud at sunset. As a female artist Nabanita’s use of line, texture, and colour is extracted from nature. Unexpectedly water breaks out of its sac. Babies float in the womb. It proclaims: Woman is an embodiment of fertility – the proud bearer of life.

    The images relates to Nabanita’s cultural experiences. The sight of idyllic countryside – women unceremoniously dip into ponds fringed with trees – fish frolic, children play, men fish, smoke beedi. But seductive, sensual beauty is fragile, a blessing and a curse. In the Asian countries, objectified woman is at the centre of fertility tourism, straddling along with the age old sex tourism. The booming exploitation of woman, the very idea of treating her as pleasurable sex object or worse, mars the beauty and purity that once inspired poets and artists alike. The artist is keenly aware of the revolting shift. The fragments of nature, culture, and the joy of family hold the hope. At the same time conflict, sadness and fear are intertwined into her work.

    Her language of art is allegoric treatment of painful reality and contemporary social issues. Metaphors for male female encounter in real space make it relevant for all times. Her use of mythology, miniature painting tradition and popular culture includes visuals from the Indian comic books. It brings to light feminist and queer narratives. Ideas are interwoven with socio-economic-political reality in contemporary urban life. For her keen observation of life around her Nabanita received recognition for her sensitive portrayal of the woman’s inner self.

    Her journey to Korea and China enriched her experience. Her art thrives on her interaction with people. Her search is however to identify how identity is formed in the in-between spaces of cross cultural encounter. She naturally gravitates towards women’s issues, which are underrepresented and who often do not have a place in mainstream media. Her art raise questions about what and where woman is at the moment, while evoking issues such as identity, tradition and modernity, motherhood, and the role of art in social change.

    What is distinctly Nabanita is her commentary on Metamorphosis – the ease with which she communicates the idea of transformation by means of hybridity and distortion of form is engrossing. The stitchery as surface pattern is the vein filled with human blood and sweat. It is expressive of the strength and structure she values in life. It is also the empathy she shares with those downtrodden and those who those who struggle for survival against overwhelming odds. Thus, the marginalized and the brave female central to the narrative gains ultimate victory through the blessings of the bloodthirsty warrior goddess

    The silence within the landscape is the abstract space, in which texture of minimal shapes and colourful human and animal forms are vital elements. It holds a mirror to classical Indian miniature she admires and strives to make it a major role player. Stitch by stitch the built up texture is derived from indigenous kantha. It is a patterned quilt lovingly made by a matriarch to swaddle a newborn. Nabanita’s paintings are borne of love for the woman, the mother and the caregiver. Her paintings come from unrestrained passion for life and justice.

  • Academics

    MFA (2007) and BFA (2005) in painting from Rabindra Bharati University .

  • Exhibitions

    • Art Trust Annual Group Show in 2015 at Birla Academy , Kolkata.
    • Art Bull Summer Auction in 2015: “Grow With The Future Now”. Emerging, contemporary and masters, all in one auction organized by Art Bull.
    • White Paper Decoding Memory at Art Konsult: a group show in 2014 at Delhi
    • Elements of the Earth at Art Konsult: a group show in 2014 at Delhi
    • In ‘She’ at Art Konsult: a group show in 2014 at Delhi
    • Participated in Annual Art Fair at Aakriti Art Gallery in Kolkata, 2014
    • Art India Fair in 2013 at Delhi
    • The Emerging artist 2A Indo Korean Young Artist Exhibition at Seoul , Korea in 2013
    • Chennai Auction in 2013 at Chennai
    • Art Bull Auction in 2012: “Grow With The Future Now”.
    • Allegory: A group exhibition in 2012 Delhi presented by Art Konsult.
    • Stroke and Chisel Art at Emami Chisel Gallery, at Kolkata in 2012.
    • India Art Fair in 2012 Delhi
    • The Emerging Artist 1: A Indo – Korean Young Artist Exhibition at Chennai in 2013.
    • Paradigms Perspective at Singapore organized by Indigo Blue art Gallery in 2012.
    • The Dramatic Of Diverse Interpretation/ Perspective: by Art Konsult 2012 , Delhi
    • Young Bengal: A group show at Ahuja Museum in 2012 at Kolkata.
    • Aranya: an Annual Exhibition organized by Rad in 2012 Kolkata.
    • Grow With The Future Now: Art bull Autumn Auction in 2011.
    • Future Museum Collection 3: Curated by Johny ML at Art Konsult in 2011 at Delhi.
    • The Lost Sparrow by India Habitat Centre,Art Konsult & Gallery Threshold in 2011 Delhi
    • Gennext V: at Aakriti Art Gallery in 2010 at Kolkata.
    • Gennext IV: at Aakriti Art Gallery in 2010 at Kolkata.
    • Aranya: an Annual Exhibition organized by Rad in 2010 Kolkata.
    • Art trust Group Exhibition at Birla Academy Art and Culture at Kolkata in 2013
    • Birla Annual Exhibition at Birla Academy Art and Culture at Kolkata 2010
    • online Exhibition held at Monart Gallery 2009, Kolkata
    • All India Annual Exhibition in Academy Of Fine Art in Kolkata, 2009.
    • Group Exhibition held at Academy of Fine Arts in Kolkata ,2009
    • Group Exhibition held at Yapan Chitra Art Gallery in Kolkata 2007
    • Annual Art Exhibition of Birla Academy of Art and Culture in Kolkata ,2006
    • Gaganendranath Pradarshan Shala A Group Exhibition in Kolkata 2003
    • Annual Exhibition in Rabindra Bharati University in Kolkata since 2001 - 2007

    WORK SHOP

    • Participated in workshop conducted by Kolkata Painter’s 80 on Network , 2015.

    • Participated in workshop conducted by College of Art, Delhi ( Samhita ), 2007


  • Award & Recognition

    Certificate of Merit from Rabindra Bharati University (Kolkata) in the year 2006 .

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