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Mayank Shyam

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About Artist

Mayank is one of the few Gond artists to free himself from an inspiration exclusively linked to his roots. His art creates a bridge between tradition and innovation. His works on paper and canvas express a personal vi...

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Mayank is one of the few Gond artists to free himself from an inspiration exclusively linked to his roots. His art creates a bridge between tradition and innovation. His works on paper and canvas express a personal vision. The forms involve geometry. Many of his papers have insects as a topic. The spider is omnipresent in them. The symmetry of the body deploys its members in a perfect geometry. A mirror effect that we can find in Mayank’s drawings. The randomness disrupts graphically and poetically this apparent order. For example, the body of the spider sees itself being extended by a double lizard’s tail. One rising towards the top, the other, in a reversed effect, down, as are opposed the figures in card games. One thinks of the drawings of M. C. Escher, who, by a subtle play of contrary perspectives abysses the look (= mettre en abyme). The backgrounds, worked in “rotring”, are studded with etching and points. They evoke the air, the water, but also the unspeakable, the dream, the night.

Mayank Kumar Shyam is the son of the famous painter Jangarh Singh Shyam (1960s–2001). He was born in 1987 in Madya Pradesh, India. Mayank’s work was exhibited for the first time in Calcutta when he was nineteen years old. Born in 1987 in Bhopal, Mayank is one of the rare Gond painters whose art is not exclusively linked to his local culture. His work comprises aspects of innovation and Gond tradition. Mayank’s work is highly promising. It underlines the fact that, with regard to these young Indian artists, whose culture is so very different from the one that rules the contemporary art world, it is essential that we look on art with as much insight as possible, and that our contemplation of works from other cultures must distance itself from the view, which is still all too present, that the art we are looking at is purely folkloric.

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4 Sold Artworks

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  • About Artist

    Mayank is one of the few Gond artists to free himself from an inspiration exclusively linked to his roots. His art creates a bridge between tradition and innovation. His works on paper and canvas express a personal vision. The forms involve geometry. Many of his papers have insects as a topic. The spider is omnipresent in them. The symmetry of the body deploys its members in a perfect geometry. A mirror effect that we can find in Mayank’s drawings. The randomness disrupts graphically and poetically this apparent order. For example, the body of the spider sees itself being extended by a double lizard’s tail. One rising towards the top, the other, in a reversed effect, down, as are opposed the figures in card games. One thinks of the drawings of M. C. Escher, who, by a subtle play of contrary perspectives abysses the look (= mettre en abyme). The backgrounds, worked in “rotring”, are studded with etching and points. They evoke the air, the water, but also the unspeakable, the dream, the night.

    Mayank Kumar Shyam is the son of the famous painter Jangarh Singh Shyam (1960s–2001). He was born in 1987 in Madya Pradesh, India. Mayank’s work was exhibited for the first time in Calcutta when he was nineteen years old. Born in 1987 in Bhopal, Mayank is one of the rare Gond painters whose art is not exclusively linked to his local culture. His work comprises aspects of innovation and Gond tradition. Mayank’s work is highly promising. It underlines the fact that, with regard to these young Indian artists, whose culture is so very different from the one that rules the contemporary art world, it is essential that we look on art with as much insight as possible, and that our contemplation of works from other cultures must distance itself from the view, which is still all too present, that the art we are looking at is purely folkloric.

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