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A V Llango

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About Artist

A self-taught artist, A.V. Ilango made his debut in 1973 on completing his Masters in Mathematics at the Bangalore University.

Inspired by his childhood memories, he set off with a colourful palette.

From seven to sixteen years, he had spent his childhood in Gobichettipalayam, a market town in the hinterland of Tamil Nadu. It is situated in picturesque plains richly covered with paddy fields and coconut groves with the canal meandering lazily across the fields and the hazy blue mountains frame the backdrop. In the town, the white-washed houses with red-tiled roofs line the narrow streets.

Everyday life is orchestrated with agricultural activities, trade and also religious celebrations. Thus the harvest, fairs and festivals resound with folk songs, music and dances. People sing and dance, and patiently queue before the shrines. All their movements are tuned to the drumbeat and tinkling ankle bells. Clad in ochre dhotis, musicians and dancers enliven the crowd with leaps and swirls in ecstasy. The bright costumes, pulsating music, bellowing traders, echoing loud speakers… The artist vividly recalls those scenes on his canvas.

Married at 27 years, he migrated with his family from Bangalore to Madurai, the ancient seat of Dravidian culture. The architectural and sculptural splendors of Madurai temples fascinated him. He sketched in the Meenakshi temple to execute paintings in the pointillist style with monochrome tones highlighting granite texture. Nataraja, Meenakshi Kalyanam and Rathi were inspired by the elegance of medieval classical sculpture. The indelible impressions of festivals, fairs were rendered with bold impastos. The contrast of the ethnic colours accentuated the linear quality on his oil paintings – Karagam, Kavadi, Oyilattam to name a few of that early Utsav series.

In 1979, once again moving to Madras in the pursuit of his artistic career, he found this big city hardly inspiring. It is the modern cultural and industrial centre. The noise, traffic jams, pollution, squalor and stench of this urban environment resulted in the dismal tones of his oil paintings titled Aggression, Agony, Injustice, Ruins, Desert, Melancholy, etc. Willingly to emerge out of that depressive phase, he changed his subject to create the Rhythm 85 collection in joyous tones. At the end of the eighties, A. V. Ilango allowed the urban influences to gradually evoke vivid figurations of artisans, workers, beggars harmonized with auto-rickshaws, buses, lorries, cycles. Man, woman or a group of people at work, rest or in celebration, as subject of study, he preferred to depict the human form elegant, tanned in the bright Indian sun, robust in dhoti and sari. The female head and torso were rendered in rotund forms. Inspired from the marapachi doll (brown wooden doll) and the giant kaval deivam (terracotta village guardians), Ilango conceived his human forms to arrive at harmonious compositions. Light and dark tones were interlaced with subtle and bold lines. In the course of three decades, the residual forms, structural lines and monologous or analogous or complementary colour schemes culminated in his recent Women series.

The last decade saw his palette mellow.

The decorative elements disappeared.

Minimalist compositions were etched in the sublime harmony of black and white positive and negative spaces space and form.

Some works have caught the dramatic moment of an action. Whereas in others, forms merge into the space. The artist opines that his way of conceptualizing, as a mathematician, has contributed a lot to his artistic research. He values the linear quality in his oeuvre, and the development of a concept and the motif. Each theme evolves in such a way that the presentation is distinguished from period to period or at the same time.

Besides human figure, the artist has been studying for the past few years, the most familiar animals of the Indians. According to him, cows and bulls form the very idiom of primitive, folk and classical arts of India. The Indian species which inspire him are not robust, forming an angular structure. The horns are highlighted. Alone or in herd they are seen everywhere, in the countryside as well as in the metropolis. This series Bull and Beyond evoke meditative poses of bovine creatures rendered in earthy hues.

Besides human figure, the artist has been studying for the past few years, the most familiar animals of the Indians. According to him, cows and bulls form the very idiom of primitive, folk and classical arts of India. The Indian species which inspire him are not robust, forming an angular structure. The horns are highlighted. Alone or in herd they are seen everywhere, in the countryside as well as in the metropolis. This series Bull and Beyond evoke meditative poses of bovine creatures rendered in earthy hues.

Now Ilango goes beyond the bull which is the mascot of Lord Shiva, called Nandhi. In hindu philosophy, the bull symbolizes the human prowess. In everyday life, it is used as beast of burden and for transport, sport, manure, hide, meat and milk. Many sketches and paintings bring out the subtle harmony in these compositions.

“I am fascinated by the form on the space.
I go with them on a voyage of discovery
to understand their complexity and simplicity.
Finally, I see things existing
in the purest of forms.
Space and form are interwoven,
merged into one another,
until the original form becomes
intangible, imperceptible, sublime…”

Testimonials

  • BIODATA

  • About Artist

    A self-taught artist, A.V. Ilango made his debut in 1973 on completing his Masters in Mathematics at the Bangalore University.

    Inspired by his childhood memories, he set off with a colourful palette.

    From seven to sixteen years, he had spent his childhood in Gobichettipalayam, a market town in the hinterland of Tamil Nadu. It is situated in picturesque plains richly covered with paddy fields and coconut groves with the canal meandering lazily across the fields and the hazy blue mountains frame the backdrop. In the town, the white-washed houses with red-tiled roofs line the narrow streets.

    Everyday life is orchestrated with agricultural activities, trade and also religious celebrations. Thus the harvest, fairs and festivals resound with folk songs, music and dances. People sing and dance, and patiently queue before the shrines. All their movements are tuned to the drumbeat and tinkling ankle bells. Clad in ochre dhotis, musicians and dancers enliven the crowd with leaps and swirls in ecstasy. The bright costumes, pulsating music, bellowing traders, echoing loud speakers… The artist vividly recalls those scenes on his canvas.

    Married at 27 years, he migrated with his family from Bangalore to Madurai, the ancient seat of Dravidian culture. The architectural and sculptural splendors of Madurai temples fascinated him. He sketched in the Meenakshi temple to execute paintings in the pointillist style with monochrome tones highlighting granite texture. Nataraja, Meenakshi Kalyanam and Rathi were inspired by the elegance of medieval classical sculpture. The indelible impressions of festivals, fairs were rendered with bold impastos. The contrast of the ethnic colours accentuated the linear quality on his oil paintings – Karagam, Kavadi, Oyilattam to name a few of that early Utsav series.

    In 1979, once again moving to Madras in the pursuit of his artistic career, he found this big city hardly inspiring. It is the modern cultural and industrial centre. The noise, traffic jams, pollution, squalor and stench of this urban environment resulted in the dismal tones of his oil paintings titled Aggression, Agony, Injustice, Ruins, Desert, Melancholy, etc. Willingly to emerge out of that depressive phase, he changed his subject to create the Rhythm 85 collection in joyous tones. At the end of the eighties, A. V. Ilango allowed the urban influences to gradually evoke vivid figurations of artisans, workers, beggars harmonized with auto-rickshaws, buses, lorries, cycles. Man, woman or a group of people at work, rest or in celebration, as subject of study, he preferred to depict the human form elegant, tanned in the bright Indian sun, robust in dhoti and sari. The female head and torso were rendered in rotund forms. Inspired from the marapachi doll (brown wooden doll) and the giant kaval deivam (terracotta village guardians), Ilango conceived his human forms to arrive at harmonious compositions. Light and dark tones were interlaced with subtle and bold lines. In the course of three decades, the residual forms, structural lines and monologous or analogous or complementary colour schemes culminated in his recent Women series.

    The last decade saw his palette mellow.

    The decorative elements disappeared.

    Minimalist compositions were etched in the sublime harmony of black and white positive and negative spaces space and form.

    Some works have caught the dramatic moment of an action. Whereas in others, forms merge into the space. The artist opines that his way of conceptualizing, as a mathematician, has contributed a lot to his artistic research. He values the linear quality in his oeuvre, and the development of a concept and the motif. Each theme evolves in such a way that the presentation is distinguished from period to period or at the same time.

    Besides human figure, the artist has been studying for the past few years, the most familiar animals of the Indians. According to him, cows and bulls form the very idiom of primitive, folk and classical arts of India. The Indian species which inspire him are not robust, forming an angular structure. The horns are highlighted. Alone or in herd they are seen everywhere, in the countryside as well as in the metropolis. This series Bull and Beyond evoke meditative poses of bovine creatures rendered in earthy hues.

    Besides human figure, the artist has been studying for the past few years, the most familiar animals of the Indians. According to him, cows and bulls form the very idiom of primitive, folk and classical arts of India. The Indian species which inspire him are not robust, forming an angular structure. The horns are highlighted. Alone or in herd they are seen everywhere, in the countryside as well as in the metropolis. This series Bull and Beyond evoke meditative poses of bovine creatures rendered in earthy hues.

    Now Ilango goes beyond the bull which is the mascot of Lord Shiva, called Nandhi. In hindu philosophy, the bull symbolizes the human prowess. In everyday life, it is used as beast of burden and for transport, sport, manure, hide, meat and milk. Many sketches and paintings bring out the subtle harmony in these compositions.

    “I am fascinated by the form on the space.
    I go with them on a voyage of discovery
    to understand their complexity and simplicity.
    Finally, I see things existing
    in the purest of forms.
    Space and form are interwoven,
    merged into one another,
    until the original form becomes
    intangible, imperceptible, sublime…”

  • Exhibitions

    ONE MAN SHOWS:

    1980 Pandian Hotel, Madurai

    1980 & 84 Alliance Franзaise of Madras

    1985 Allliance Franзaise of Bangalore

    1985 Rhythm 85, C.P. Art Centre, Madras

    1986 & 88 Jehangir Art Gallery, Bombay.

    1989 & 91 Grindlays Art Gallery, Madras

    1990 Chola Art Gallery, Madras

    1994 Rhythm 94, British Council Division, Madras

    1995 The Bhownagree Gallery, The Commonwealth Institute, London

    1996 Grindlays Art Gallery, New Delhi

    1996 Silapathikaram - Manimekalai,
    British Council Division and The Book Point, Madras

    1997 The Chennai Series, Landmark, Madras

    1998 Bull and Beyond, Alliance Française of Madras

    1999 Dauphin Gallery, Singapore

    2000 Jamaat Gallery, Bombay

    2001 Utsav, Lakshana Art Gallery, Hyderabad

    2002 Stree Mayam, Jamaat Gallery, Mumbai

    2002 Utsav 2002, Lakshana Art Gallery, Bangalore

    2002 Line, Space, Rhythm by the Bullukian Foundation, Lyons France

    2002 Chennai Series by the British Council Division, The Forum Gallery, Chennai

    2003 Women Series, Chitrakala Parishath, by The Forum Art Gallery, Bangalore

    2004 Women Series, The Forum Art Gallery, Chennai.

    2004 Hotel Lyon Est , Lyons, France

    2005 Utsav, Sutra Dance Theatre, Kuala Lumpur , Malaysia

    Under the Spell, Paintings on Odissi dance at Istana Budaya (National Theatre) Kuala Lumpur Malaysia

    2005 Under the Spell, the Forum Art Gallery, Chennai

    2006 Exhibition at the Indian Consulate General, New York,USA

    2006 Utsav, Hotel Windsor Manor, Bangalore

    2006 Utsav, San Francisco, USA

    2007 Utsav , Jamaat Gallery , Mumbai

    2007 Second Reincarnation , Sutra Dance Theatre, Kuala Lumpur , Malaysia

    2007 The Bovine Principle , Art Smart gallery, Trivendrum

    2008 The Bovine Principle , Forum Art Gallery Chennai

    2008 Introspection , Tamarind Art council, New york.

    2008 Utsav 2008 Art space The Gallery, KL, Malaysia.

    2010 Utsav 2010 Forum Art Gallery, Chennai.


    GROUP SHOWS :

    1984 Alliance Française of Madras

    1985 Russian Cultural Centre, Madras

    1986 Alliance Franзaise of Bangalore.

    1987 Sakshi Art Gallery, Madras.

    1989 The Gallery, Madras

    1992 & 94 Temple of Fine Arts, Kuala Lumpur and Singapore

    1996 Madras-An Emotion – An Exhibition of Contemporary Indian Art, Values Art Foundation, Chennai.

    1996 Urban Signals and Shifting Images IV,
    Birla Academy of Art & Culture, Bombay.

    2002 Inaugural Show, The Forum Art Gallery, Chennai.

    2008 Athreya Gallery , Chennai. India

    2009 Lining the Streets, Chennai Sangamam 2009, The Forum Gallery, Chennai.

    2009 10 /10 Anniversary show, Jamaat Gallery, Mumbai.

    2009 Art Fusion Show – Tamil Nadu & Kerala, Nehru Centre, Mumbai.

    2010 Art smart Collection, Travancore Art Gallery, Kasturba Gandhi Marg, New Delhi – 1

    2010 Jamaat Gallery, Mumbai

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